Session #2

 

 

Turn On, Tune Up: The Future of Instrumental Tuition

OPEN TO ALL but of particular relevance to: tutors & music leaders working with music education hubs, school music departments and hub / organisation managers / leaders 

 

The format for these sessions is a webinar presentation of 60-80 mins with the option to stay on for post presentation discussion with speakers and colleagues for a further 20 mins.

We are on the cusp of a paradigm shift in instrumental learning. Students can use VR to experience playing with a symphony orchestra (or stand in front of a conservatoire admissions panel) without leaving their room. Wearable technologies allow teachers to monitor posture and movement, support technique development and avoid injury. Smart scores allow students in ensembles to self-differentiate their parts and receive feedback on their timing and accuracy.

As these technologies become commonplace, we are in a position to extend, rather than replace, the role of the instrumental tutor, enabling them to better support practice, ensemble playing and examinations. In this session we will hear from those researching and building the technologies described above. We will consider how the ‘gamification’ of skills learning can increase student engagement and retention. There will also be an opportunity to share and discuss ideas and make connections with like-minded colleagues.

You will come away with:

  • A clear picture of technologies that could shape instrumental teaching in the coming years, and how you can position yourself and/or your organisation in response.
  • Practical ways to incorporate current technologies into your instrumental lessons.
  • A list of websites and apps that ‘gamify’ ear training, music theory and practice.

Speakers

Dr George Waddell  is Lecturer in Performance Science at the Royal College of Music and Research Associate in the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College London. His research focuses on the evaluation of performance, including decision-making among judges and audiences and the development of evaluative skills, as well as how technology can be used to enhance how performance is assessed and learned. George worked on the TELMI project, funded by the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, which sought to develop technologies that enhance instrumental music teaching. He is a coauthor of the textbook Performing Music Research (OUP) and a Consulting Editor for the journal Musicae Scientiae and an Associate Editor for Frontiers in Performance Science.


Professor Ed Hughes is a composer, lecturer in composition at Sussex University and chair of the Sussex Festival of Ideas.

His work over several years with the Orchestra of Sound and Light, Music Hubs and educational institutions led to the conception and development of a system for networked notation to support beginner ensemble playing. This system, called Syncphonia and now available as a free app, helps to keep young people engaged in their ensembles, allowing them to play more complicated pieces for longer and with fewer interruptions.

Can't make the date(s) but don't want to miss out?

If you BOOK / REGISTER in advance for an event, a day or so after it's taken place, we will give you access to follow up links and recordings of speaker's presentations to view online (not download) at your leisure for up to 30 days. So, you can still have much of the experience!